Rail served lumber yards/saw mills.

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#1
Hi folks,
Can anyone point me in the right direction please, I’m looking for decent photos and information on rural (off the beat and track) rail served lumber yards and saw mills, anything from the 1950s through to the modern era. I’m looking for images of the type of cars used, trucks that hauled timber and in particular photos of the types of saws used in the mills. I’d like to know how the timber was moved (unloaded) between the rail and the mill.
I’m fairly up to date with the types of equipment used in British saw mills as I spent many years working as a saw operator but I’d like to know how things are set up in the USA.

Kindest Regards.
 

Bill Anderson

Well-Known Member
#2
#3
Back in the 50's and 60's my grandfather collected a number of books about lumber and saw mills in the Pacific Northwest region of the US. Some of these books (or reprints) look like they might be available on Amazon.
https://www.amazon.com/This-Was-Sawmilling-Ralph-Andrews/dp/0887405940
https://www.amazon.com/Railroads-Wo...ds+in+the+woods&qid=1563042844&s=books&sr=1-1

An imaginative search of Amazon, eBay, etc may turn up more titles.
Thanks very much, I’ll definitely check those books out.
 





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