Track Diamonds

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gascharfetter

New Member
My name is Greg Scharfetter. I'm a new subscriber to this forum. I'm not sure if this is the right location to post this question, but I need to ask somewhere. My question is about crossing diamonds. Did all crossings, even in the 20's and 30's have a complete diamond guard rail in the middle? We've had some discussion about this. All diamonds (guard rails) I see currently are complete within the crossing. But I wonder if on very low angle crossings (less than 20 degrees) of that era, would that still be true? I see value in the guard rails on the "north and south" points in guiding the flanges, but on the "east and west" points of shallow angles (similar to a turnout frog), I don't see the guard rails at those locations protecting anything. I hope I have made myself clear. It's hard to describe without actually showing a drawing. If you can help, I appreciate it.

Greg
 

Robert Gift

former OL presenter
My name is Greg Scharfetter. I'm a new subscriber to this forum. I'm not sure if this is the right location to post this question, but I need to ask somewhere. My question is about crossing diamonds. Did all crossings, even in the 20's and 30's have a complete diamond guard rail in the middle? We've had some discussion about this. All diamonds (guard rails) I see currently are complete within the crossing. But I wonder if on very low angle crossings (less than 20 degrees) of that era, would that still be true? I see value in the guard rails on the "north and south" points in guiding the flanges, but on the "east and west" points of shallow angles (similar to a turnout frog), I don't see the guard rails at those locations protecting anything. I hope I have made myself clear. It's hard to describe without actually showing a drawing. If you can help, I appreciate it.

Greg
Can you post a picture?
I wondered if the wheel flanges ran onto a surface below the railhead to eliminate the impact of the wheel on the following rail as it travels over the flange gap.

I can see a problem withe acute angle. The obtuse angle would not be a problem in which to place guard rails.
 

Norm Echtinaw

New Member
Not sure about older diamonds, but a couple years ago CN replaced the diamonds in Durand,MI with one way low speed diamonds (OWLS). Both the mainlines and the slow speed side have guardrails leading to and through them.
 

Robert Gift

former OL presenter
Not sure about older diamonds, but a couple years ago CN replaced the diamonds in Durand,MI with one way low speed diamonds (OWLS). Both the mainlines and the slow speed side have guardrails leading to and through them.
Are you referring to the rails of the side track which rise up and the local train's wheels actually ride over the mainline rails? There are no breaks in the mainline rails.

I don't know how they can be considered ONE WAY.

Photos are here somewhere, but Search seems not to work well in finding them.
 

bcp

Member
Interesting bcp!

That switch to the left of the steam locomotive is fascinating!
Thank you.
An outside, single slip switch, according to this article:
http://www.ask.com/wiki/Crossover_(rail)?qsrc=3044#Single_slip


Single slip

A single slip switch works on the same principle as a double slip but provides for only one switching possibility. Trains approaching on one of the two crossing tracks can either continue over the crossing, or switch tracks to the other line. However, trains from the other track can only continue over the crossing, and cannot switch tracks.
...
An outside slip switch is similar to the double or single slip switches described above, except that the switch blades are outside of the diamond instead of inside. An advantage over an inside slip switch is that trains can pass the slips with higher speeds. A disadvantage over an inside slip switch is that they are longer and need more space.

An "inside" single slip switch:
 

gascharfetter

New Member
Thanks very much guys. Those photos certainly help and confirm what I was trying to capture (while others said it is not protopycal). Mine is a branch line in the mid 30's.

I'd like to post a few images of what I was doing. How do I attach photos from my file?

Greg
 

Robert Gift

former OL presenter
Nice!
Rather than cut (file) away the guard rail ends and making them sharp, can you not bend them?

I would love to make a very complicated crossing (three tracks intersecting) and see if I can make it so well that no derailments occur in it.
 

gascharfetter

New Member
Yes. I do have some turnouts with guard rails done that way. I've seen them both ways and the majority were done with the filed back wings. Just happened to start off that way. Certainly don't want to replace them. They work fine if everything is in gauge.

Greg
 




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