Southern Locomotives

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medic15al

New Member
I remember as a child the Southern Rail Road locomotives coming thru town and it seems to me they ran almost exclusively "long nose" forward. It seemed to me that it would have been easier to see "short nose" forward.

Was there a particular reason they did this?
 

medic15al

New Member
Makes sense, but figured it was safer to be able to see whats out there in front of you. But I can see the reasoning in this.

Thanks!
 

mrmoose

New Member
It was a hold over from steam days on a lot of railroads. When they all dieselized, some railroads stuck to the "long-hood forward" policy for safety at grade crossing accidents, collisions, etc. Most of your older Geeps came with a high short hood, so they ran 'em long hood forward, until the GP20's and GP30's started coming with short hoods.:cool:
 

medic15al

New Member
I see it would not be much of a difference from some of the larger steam locomotives. I didnt think of that angle. Thanks!
 

Jon Bentz

New Member
Niether Southern or N&W exclusively ran their units long hood forward. There was a safety rationale but operational situations often didn't allow for units to always be pointed the 'right' direction. These shots of Southern power are from the later 70's and early 80's.

1. Southbound GP35's on Erlanger Hill south of Cincinnati.

2. Northbound piggyback leaving Danville behind lot's of HP.

3. SD40-2's descend Saluda at the lower safety spur.

4. Southbound on Erlanger Hill.
 

SamReeves

Foamer!
Niether Southern or N&W exclusively ran their units long hood forward. There was a safety rationale but operational situations often didn't allow for units to always be pointed the 'right' direction. These shots of Southern power are from the later 70's and early 80's.

1. Southbound GP35's on Erlanger Hill south of Cincinnati.

2. Northbound piggyback leaving Danville behind lot's of HP.

3. SD40-2's descend Saluda at the lower safety spur.

4. Southbound on Erlanger Hill.
Beautiful slides Jon, especially there at Saluda.
 

Pat

Photo Critiques Welcome
Niether Southern or N&W exclusively ran their units long hood forward. There was a safety rationale but operational situations often didn't allow for units to always be pointed the 'right' direction.
I have read in later years the Southern and N&W stuck with high short hoods to keep crews from being able to demand their lead unit be turned.
 

markgillings

BNSF Gandy
I have read in later years the Southern and N&W stuck with high short hoods to keep crews from being able to demand their lead unit be turned.
...Which supports the following exerpt from a Doug Koontz post to LocoNotes on March 6, 2011:

"The real reason was bi-directional use of the locomotive. A normal low hood can be run both ways as we all know. What was different on SR was union agreements stipulated crews had to operate windshields front. By building a high-hood the locomotives had EQUAL windshields front and back. This allowed SR to do away with turntables, wyes and some hostlers and run the loco whichever way it was turned.

WHAT SR did was put a little PR spin on the situation, saying it was safer for crews to run long-hood forward or with a high short hood. This was simply bull as the units ran about 50/50 front hood/long hood forward since SR reduced turntables, wye and hostlers. It the unit leads LHF one-way it comes back SHF the return trip."
 

medic15al

New Member
Ah, ok. I have learned a lot here so far!

I take it the engineer MUST be on the starbord side while in operation.
 

nsrayman

Railroad Photographer
These units were equipped with two control stands for bi-directional operation.

no , all Southern locomotives built after 1968 were set up long hood forward with one control stand. NW hi nose units had dual controls but not SR.
 

Jon Bentz

New Member
Well, you learn something new every day! Didn't know that. I just assumed they had dual control stands - same as the N&W units. Here are a few N&W shots from the early 80's in Ohio.

1. N&W SD35 1567 southbound on the Sandusky Branch at Cooke Rd in Columbus.

2. SD45 1799 southbound at Glenndale Ohio north of Cincinnati.

3. GP30 2905 just entering Mehring Way on the riverfront line that literally threaded it's way under and over other rail lines. This is now gone.

4. SD40-2 6163 leading a southbound pool train on Southern tracks between Cincinnati and Danville.

no , all Southern locomotives built after 1968 were set up long hood forward with one control stand. NW hi nose units had dual controls but not SR.
 

Pat

Photo Critiques Welcome
Fast forward to 2011. The short lines near me don't turn their locomotives so short hood or not they often end up running long hood forward. More than once I've noticed the engineering facing the short hood and watching forward in a mirror.
 




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