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IronMtnTom

New Member
Hello, I'm new to the forum here, but not new to my craft. I've been in the transport, hauling, specialized rigging and various facets of the construction industry for most of my life. I've developed a bit of a niche business and have a unique approach to handling the needs of folks that have an interest in getting something moved , but haven't had the opportunity or a good experience with the last people providing the service to speak of.

My main focus is transporting railroad and various types of equipment on my specialized lowbed and flatbed trailers
caboose delivered 6-13-19.jpg
Coady's~Caboose #1.jpg
Coady's~Caboose #2.jpg
Coady'sTowingWrecker #2.jpg
KingstonNY Move 6-13-19 #1.jpg
BIZCARDS.jpg
. I've moved several cabooses and a few flat TTX cars, and various trucks and wheel sets for various railroads and individuals around the New England area, where I am located. Recently as April 2020, I was contacted by an individual in Dallas, Tx. to move a non-running, overwidth Track Mobile from East St. Louis, Mo. to Dallas, and a generator set to Austin, Tx. Then reloaded with used rail back north to Missouri.

We offer specialized, customized loading and unloading services utilizing mobile cranes and heavy wreckers and rotators to aid in loading and unloading on-site, and provide labor and mechanical services to do much of the work. We move trucks and wheel sets to various states for re-profiling and reconditioning, among many other services. Basically anything to do with hauling something related to railroad equipment, we like to be involved in. Can move car bodies typically up to 40 feet in length; height as much as 10' 6" from bottom of car to highest point of the roof.

Based here in Vermont, we serve all of the northeast, and areas far beyond. Last big trip was out to Denver, Co. for the Union Pacific Railway, hauled a new Pettibone Quick Swing machine to them from the Pettibone factory up in northern Michigan.

Please contact me, Tom Szirbik, Sr. for a discussion for anything you might need to move. It's a low keyed, old fashioned small American family owned and operated business you'd be dealing with, and we appreciate every single inquiry we receive. Thanks for reading.
 

Bill Anderson

Well-Known Member
Welcome aboard. I would love to see more photos of you moving railroad equipment. I imagine it is s something few of us on the forum have experienced first hand.

I am amazed when I see such heavy objects as a steam engine or diesel being moved via flatbed. A recent, tragic example up here in the PNW was the derailment of the Portland bound Cascades near Dupont, WA. The diesel engine and Talgo passenger cars were removed from the scene by a pair of trucks pushing and pulling heavy duty flatbed trailers.
 

IronMtnTom

New Member
Welcome aboard. I would love to see more photos of you moving railroad equipment. I imagine it is s something few of us on the forum have experienced first hand.

I am amazed when I see such heavy objects as a steam engine or diesel being moved via flatbed. A recent, tragic example up here in the PNW was the derailment of the Portland bound Cascades near Dupont, WA. The diesel engine and Talgo passenger cars were removed from the scene by a pair of trucks pushing and pulling heavy duty flatbed trailers.

Hello Bill,

Thanks for the view and reply. I truly enjoy being around the entire railroad community and the whole industry, being an "engineer" without a degree as I proclaim to be. I'm referring to a "practical/mechanical engineer"...not the guy who drives the train to clarify. Many years of doing unique jobs and work just keeps the internal flame going for more and more of this type of work for me. I should be thinking about retirement in a few years, but instead I continue to try to develop new ways to make more connections and advance more into this specialized field and continue to enjoy my work as I always have. I truly love what I do, and it is a lifestyle, not just a job or business to me.

My operation is kind of limited to the size of what I can and cannot handle. I have a certain limit for size and weight and dimensions that I stick to so I can maintain what I like to get involved with. But there's always something to do, and I usually end up pushing the envelope to make the project go well. I'm in the planning stages of moving a caboose in June, just a short haul from a depot in Vermont to a New Hampshire homeowner actually, who was a railroad employee...since retired. But he has to have this caboose sitting next to his garage, and he's in the process of installing about 100 ft. of used rail on an elevated bed to accommodate this caboose. Once that's completed, we'll go ahead and lift the caboose off the trucks, and set it on a lowbed trailer. The trucks will be lifted onto another separate trailer and we'll all go together to the destination and re-set everything. This is a pretty easy move, and should only be a good, long day's work for us. This one below is about the same size as the one we're waiting to do.
Coady's~Caboose #1.jpg
 

Bob

Forum Host
Staff member
No, really honey! I bought on eBay. It said "Lionel" in the photo, how was I supposed to know it was full size?

Yeah, I got free prime shipping...
 

IronMtnTom

New Member
That's a sweet looking Pettibone, and looks brand new! Somebody's getting a nice addition to the MOW roster! We had an old one years ago, but sold it to a competitor. It wasn't really suited to the type of contract work we do.



Yes, it was a brand spanking new one, I picked up from the Pettibone plant up in northern Michigan. I carried it right straight to the Union Pacific railway yard in Denver. I was impressed that Pettibone was still going, I know they made a ton of iron in the 60's and 70's, known for their all-terrain forklifts for lumbermills, loggers, etc. The manager and I had a good talk and he said they almost tanked in the 80's, but due to some re-engineering and a couple of smart product line introductions, they brought themselves back from almost extinction which is great.
 

IronMtnTom

New Member
No, really honey! I bought on eBay. It said "Lionel" in the photo, how was I supposed to know it was full size?

Yeah, I got free prime shipping...

Wifey's REALLY gonna be impressed when we arrive with that caboose and it gets set onto them rails for her to stare out the living room window at in June, LOL! But hey, not everybody can say they have one in their yard.

That orange Lionel caboose I posted was purchased up in New Hampshire off a private individual and I moved it to Kingston, NY to a gent that bought it to set alongside his woodworking shop on an old siding, about 200 feet from an active CSX line. His intent was to just have it to "drink beer in", and give the CSX crews something to look at while they're working. What's better than that? LOL.
 
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Bill Anderson

Well-Known Member
At one time US railroads would give or sell retired cabooses to employees to use as summer cottages. When I was a kid back in the 50's, I remember seeing one beside a highway from Portland, OR to the coast.
 

Truckdad

New Member
Hello, I'm new to the forum here, but not new to my craft. I've been in the transport, hauling, specialized rigging and various facets of the construction industry for most of my life. I've developed a bit of a niche business and have a unique approach to handling the needs of folks that have an interest in getting something moved , but haven't had the opportunity or a good experience with the last people providing the service to speak of.

My main focus is transporting railroad and various types of equipment on my specialized lowbed and flatbed trailersView attachment 92590View attachment 92591View attachment 92592View attachment 92593View attachment 92594View attachment 92596. I've moved several cabooses and a few flat TTX cars, and various trucks and wheel sets for various railroads and individuals around the New England area, where I am located. Recently as April 2020, I was contacted by an individual in Dallas, Tx. to move a non-running, overwidth Track Mobile from East St. Louis, Mo. to Dallas, and a generator set to Austin, Tx. Then reloaded with used rail back north to Missouri.

We offer specialized, customized loading and unloading services utilizing mobile cranes and heavy wreckers and rotators to aid in loading and unloading on-site, and provide labor and mechanical services to do much of the work. We move trucks and wheel sets to various states for re-profiling and reconditioning, among many other services. Basically anything to do with hauling something related to railroad equipment, we like to be involved in. Can move car bodies typically up to 40 feet in length; height as much as 10' 6" from bottom of car to highest point of the roof.

Based here in Vermont, we serve all of the northeast, and areas far beyond. Last big trip was out to Denver, Co. for the Union Pacific Railway, hauled a new Pettibone Quick Swing machine to them from the Pettibone factory up in northern Michigan.

Please contact me, Tom Szirbik, Sr. for a discussion for anything you might need to move. It's a low keyed, old fashioned small American family owned and operated business you'd be dealing with, and we appreciate every single inquiry we receive. Thanks for reading.
Tom, it looks like we have been able to play in the same sandbox.....

caboose3.jpg

Dave
 

Bob

Forum Host
Staff member
At one time US railroads would give or sell retired cabooses to employees to use as summer cottages. When I was a kid back in the 50's, I remember seeing one beside a highway from Portland, OR to the coast.
There's still quite a few around. I even seriously looked at buying one a few years back.

They used to nearly give them away, or sell them very cheap. The one I looked at a few years ago was offered at $5K I think? The problem is that's only the tip of the iceberg. Then you have trucking costs and cranes to load it and unload it and building permits and trip permits and you need some ground and piece of track to put it on. Back of the envelope costs? $25K or more.

Then you have the problem of what do you do with it? You basically get a 9' x 30' room, kind of like a travel trailer.

If you need a small cabin, or a tiny guest house, they work great. But just to park in the yard? Not a whole lot of reason, unless maybe you have kids and want a playhouse for them, or maybe you need a unique pool house. But they're kind of something best suited to those who have deep pockets.
 

Bob

Forum Host
Staff member
Yes, it was a brand spanking new one, I picked up from the Pettibone plant up in northern Michigan. I carried it right straight to the Union Pacific railway yard in Denver. I was impressed that Pettibone was still going, I know they made a ton of iron in the 60's and 70's, known for their all-terrain forklifts for lumbermills, loggers, etc. The manager and I had a good talk and he said they almost tanked in the 80's, but due to some re-engineering and a couple of smart product line introductions, they brought themselves back from almost extinction which is great.
Right? Every time I see an ad, or, far more rarely, see a new one, the first thing I think is "Wait! They still make those?"

Unless you're a railroader, chances are good that you have never heard of Pettibone. Their website says they make Telehandlers, what we call "reaches", but I've never seen one around.
 

IronMtnTom

New Member
Right? Every time I see an ad, or, far more rarely, see a new one, the first thing I think is "Wait! They still make those?"

Unless you're a railroader, chances are good that you have never heard of Pettibone. Their website says they make Telehandlers, what we call "reaches", but I've never seen one around.
They're still very much into the telehandler market, along with some pretty serious snowpushing equipment that is quite unique. Pettibone around the northeast anyways, is well known for their skidders, and their straight framed loaders, with the same design of chassis used a lot for log loaders with "thumbs" on a set of big forks that come over top of the bundle of logs, etc. to hold in place. There's many old "Bones" sitting around the area that escaped the scrapping craze several years ago in the woods and weeds still.
 
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