Historical NY to NO railroad trip question

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dracopticon

New Member
Hello all you fantastic people who know trains and railways!

I have a question that might sound totally weird to you, but I need an answer in this (and I'm sorry if this is off topic on this part of the forum):

If you wanted to go by ordinary passenger train from New York to New Orleans in the 1920's (say 1921), what would the railroad company names be of the different sections along the way? I've managed to locate the AT&SF railroad company for the Lousiana part of the trip, but what was the northern part of the company names called from New York all the way down to where the AT&SF took over?

And also, where would the passenger(s) change trains before reaching New Orleans? I believe the overall time for the trip should be something like 3 days during these times, but I can easily be totally wrong here.

Sorry for the poor english, since I'm a European guy myself (from Sweden). Thanks in advance for any answer! Erik B.
 

muralist0221

Active Member
Hello all you fantastic people who know trains and railways!

I have a question that might sound totally weird to you, but I need an answer in this (and I'm sorry if this is off topic on this part of the forum):

If you wanted to go by ordinary passenger train from New York to New Orleans in the 1920's (say 1921), what would the railroad company names be of the different sections along the way? I've managed to locate the AT&SF railroad company for the Lousiana part of the trip, but what was the northern part of the company names called from New York all the way down to where the AT&SF took over?

And also, where would the passenger(s) change trains before reaching New Orleans? I believe the overall time for the trip should be something like 3 days during these times, but I can easily be totally wrong here.

Sorry for the poor english, since I'm a European guy myself (from Sweden). Thanks in advance for any answer! Erik B.
In the 1920's there was a train called the Crescent (which still exists today under Amtrak). It ran on the Pennsylvania Railroad from N.Y. to Washington D.C., then the Southern Railroad took it into New Orleans. There were through cars, so one didn't need to change trains. In Chicago you could ride the Panama Limited which went directly on Illinois Central to New Orleans. Some tourists would take a boat from N.O. through the Panama Canal to the West coast. The ATSF ran from Chicago west and south and didn't go into New Orleans. The Crescent took a day and a half and the Panama Limited took 24 hours although it might have been a little longer in those days (but not 3 days).
 

dracopticon

New Member
Thank you muralist0221!

That is excellent information. Ok, so no AT&SF then. And yeah, I also found the Crescent, but got the impression it only existed in more modern days, like the 2000 era.

The thing is, I'm gamemastering a small fictive story about some passengers on such a train in the roaring twenties for a game of Call of Cthulhu RPG, if anyone here knows what that is...? :)

Thanks again! Regards, Erik B.
 




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