Canon G12?

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Train Guy

UP Washy and S.I. Cond.
I am interested in picking up a Canon G12 for roster shooting. Anyone use one for rail photography? Primary use to to take static roster shots of locomotives and rail cars I have access to in yards and other places. Freight car pics are another interest of mine. So i have a question if the lens pulls in tight enough to be wide enough to photograph units standing pretty close to them? I.E. it needs to be pretty wide angle so I don't have to take super wedge shots.
Thanks for the help guys
Brett
 

CSX 700

New Member
I am interested in picking up a Canon G12 for roster shooting. Anyone use one for rail photography? Primary use to to take static roster shots of locomotives and rail cars I have access to in yards and other places. Freight car pics are another interest of mine. So i have a question if the lens pulls in tight enough to be wide enough to photograph units standing pretty close to them? I.E. it needs to be pretty wide angle so I don't have to take super wedge shots.
Thanks for the help guys
Brett
I have a good friend who recently picked one up. He is a railroader himself and carries it with him rather than his DSLR. Here are a couple links to shots he has posted with it

http://www.flickr.com/photos/interstates/5334015734/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/interstates/5333400399/

I have been considering picking up one myself to carry along in the truck at all times and for times when I don't want to drag out the 7D and associated lens. Image quality is excellent and it has the ability to shoot RAW which is a must as far as I'm concerned. Then again the same money spent on the G12 could go toward yet another lens for the DSLR or a second DSLR body. Those items would likely see more use than the G12, at least for me they would.

Bryan Jones
Brooks,KY
 

kenw

5th Generation Texian
quite honestly for the types of shots you mention a G12 is major overkill. I would think that a much smaller camera that could be kept in your pocket safely would be much more useful. The quality of shots and the flexibility of a $200-300 camera is today absolutely unprecedented. We just bought the wife a Canon SD4500 for <$300. The widest it goes is 36mm (35mm equivalent) and that's not super wide but I know that others in that price range and under shoot wider. It does have image stability and in the case of this particular one I can verify that it works extremely well. For the most part, the quality of the image on an inexpensive camera is very very good, what they lack is some flexibility. If you are shooting in the yard, most of those added features would be (IMHO) a waste of money. The G12 won't fit in a pocket, to me that's a big negative for a camera that needs to stay safely out of the way while you work.
 
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Train Guy

UP Washy and S.I. Cond.
Thanks guys for the input. Gives me something to think about. The only thing I worry about with any smaller point and shoot camera's is I am 6'10" and my hands are the size of dinner plates and I worry about fumbling the darn thing lol. Ya dig?

Brett
 

kenw

5th Generation Texian
it is good that you consider your hand size as that is a real issue for some. My 1st SLR (film) was based largely on that same logic (although my hands are not big: i'm probably the opposite).

go by any store that sells them and try one on for size in person, Best Buy has a good selection and they're all out in the open. the designers have gotten pretty good with making the controls pretty simple and easy to use but seeing for yourself is still necessary. The G12 isn't all that much bigger than most except in the front-back depth which is where I think it might give you difficulty in slipping it into your pocket. it is a super camera but not pocket friendly in the least. Personally if I was in your postion, pocket-ability would be very high on the list, if not #1 since the quality and other features are quite simlilar across the board among major brands.

My wife and I went to Yellowstone a few years ago and I can't tell you how many times I used her small camera (then she had a canon A540) to snag a pic of some critter who wasn't going to wait for me to get the big gun out and change from the 20mm to the 300mm. Looking at the pics 2 years later, no one can tell which camera I used other than me, and the only reason i know is because i remember.... It can be humbling when the crowd favorite of the slideshow is a pic taken with a $200 camera when everyone knows I lugged $4k worth of gear all over the park....
 




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