BNSF train symbol help

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Rick Mota

New Member
Hi everyone.
Can anyone help me on this?
I don't know the origin-destination of this grainers: X-RGTNWE and G-NWERGT
I know that the "x" is the empty and the "g" is the loaded,but i don't know the meaning of RGT and NWE.
Anyone knows about this origin/destination codes?
Many thanks!
 

setxrailfan

John 3:16
Though not a product you can consume, G symbols are used on loaded unit potash trains originating at Carlsbad, NM.
 

Ballard Beaver

ballard beaver
suffix

the pdf that thaddeusthudpucker linked i have seen before. there is another portion of the symbol that is not mentioned in this pdf. example this morning's z train out of south seattle.

z-ssechc-8-02-a

the last portion of the symbol is a single letter. the most common is "-a" but i have also heard -h, -m, -r, -d, -t, -k. somehow i came to think that -k meant that the train originated with dpus.

but i dont know, can anyone clear this up?
 

storminorman

New Member
Where's the symbol..?

So, while I am going to start watching passing trains closer for the symbol, just where do I look for this? I get to watch them roll by work all day long...one right after an other.
 
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Kevin M

New Member
When I get a stack train that has a "k" at the end it is heavy, like over tonage heavy. I always thought it meant heavy.
kevin
 

Ballard Beaver

ballard beaver
When I get a stack train that has a "k" at the end it is heavy, like over tonage heavy. I always thought it meant heavy.
kevin
well it appears the meaning of these single-letter suffixes is not fully understood by the folks on the ground...two different interpretations of the "k" -- and there are many other such suffixes. color me intrigued...
 

markgillings

BNSF Gandy
well it appears the meaning of these single-letter suffixes is not fully understood by the folks on the ground...two different interpretations of the "k" -- and there are many other such suffixes. color me intrigued...
It does not appear to be hazmat. I just looked up a couple train lists, one with a "K" suffix and one with an "A" suffix. The "A" train has hazmat while the "K" train does not!
 

RailroadJeep

The Herder Himself
Kevin is correct, K denote's it's heavy. Typically a K stack train going East will be DP'd because it's too heavy to run conventional over the hill. Granted, that's not the end all answer, realize things in the world of train symbol's aren't written in stone. Train's get block's swapped, tonnage reduced, etc., etc., after the symbol is applied (when can be almost days in advance).

In my realm of preparing consist's, the K indicates to me that it should be a DP train, and the consist need's to be setup and tested as such.
 




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