Air hose between two halves of train (doubled over in yard)?

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robjacox

New Member
Today I saw a BNSF manifest tied down in the yard in Bend, OR, doubled-over on two yard tracks.

I've never seen this before, but there was a long, coiled air line connecting the train line air hoses between the locomotive and "lead car" on the other half of the train.

I'm guessing that it is to keep both halves of the train's air brakes "charged", but why? Once the trains brakes are "set", if the angle cocks are closed, and the rear of the train is left alone, aren't the brakes set, until the train line pressure is increased? And don't hand brakes have to be applied, anyway?

With both halves of the train connected to the locomotives, doesn't the train line pressure have to stay below the "normal" pressure (90 or 110 psi, right?) to keep the brakes applied?

Or are the train brakes not even applied (train held in place by hand brakes), and are they just keep the air reservoirs fully charged?

And where do they store the hose?


(Photo taken from non-railroad property)
 

gp80mac

Remarkably Snide
Today I saw a BNSF manifest tied down in the yard in Bend, OR, doubled-over on two yard tracks.

I've never seen this before, but there was a long, coiled air line connecting the train line air hoses between the locomotive and "lead car" on the other half of the train.

I'm guessing that it is to keep both halves of the train's air brakes "charged", but why? Once the trains brakes are "set", if the angle cocks are closed, and the rear of the train is left alone, aren't the brakes set, until the train line pressure is increased? And don't hand brakes have to be applied, anyway?

With both halves of the train connected to the locomotives, doesn't the train line pressure have to stay below the "normal" pressure (90 or 110 psi, right?) to keep the brakes applied?

Or are the train brakes not even applied (train held in place by hand brakes), and are they just keep the air reservoirs fully charged?

And where do they store the hose?


(Photo taken from non-railroad property)
If a train is off of air for more than 4 hours, a new class-1 air test is required. So running the hose from the engine to the cars keeps the cars on that track "on the air".
 

roee

Active Member
I've never heard of them doing that before, and the air hose looks like it is one meant to go around a car with bad air brake rigging. But I'm sure the reason is having to do a Class 1 brake test which takes quite a bit of time, as opposed to a Class 2, Set and release.
 

setxrailfan

John 3:16
Never seen that before. The closest thing I have seen that even looks like that is "ground air". Air lines beneath the ground with gladhands above the ground for the carmen to do the initial terminal air brake test instead of the road crews where the train will originate.
 

robjacox

New Member
I've never heard of them doing that before, and the air hose looks like it is one meant to go around a car with bad air brake rigging. But I'm sure the reason is having to do a Class 1 brake test which takes quite a bit of time, as opposed to a Class 2, Set and release.
Seen that in the big yards before, but we are as small they get.

They often have to double-over here, will keep my eye open in and see if it becomes a regular thing.
 

mrmoose

New Member
Down in Seattle along Airport Way, they have portable air compressors on trailers, and they are attached to trains sitting without power. Quicker to hook up and leave, I guess.:rolleyes:
 

ciron28

I just pull levers.
I used to do that all the time in Ottumwa. We would double the train over because of no outbound crew. Just as someone else typed it saves the trainline air so you don't have to re-air test the half of the train that is off air for more than 4 hours. Pretty good idea if you don't have a yard air plant.

Travis
 




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