High ISO

Affiliate Disclosure: We may receive a commision from some of the links and ads shown on this website (Learn More Here)

RailroadBookstore.com - An online railroad bookstore featuring a curated selection of new and used railroad books. Railroad pictorials, railroad history, steam locomotives, passenger trains, modern railroading. Hundreds of titles available, most at discount prices! We also have a video and children's book section.

ModelRailroadBookstore.com - An online model railroad bookstore featuring a curated selection of new and used books. Layout design, track plans, scenery and structure building, wiring, DCC, Tinplate, Toy Trains, Price Guides and more.

Pat

Photo Critiques Welcome
#1
Up until now I've leaned toward keeping my ISO low to capture as much detail with as little noise as I could. But there are scenes the low ISO's won't catch. I went out recently to crank the ISO up and see what I could get. These were shot at ISO6400, f4, 1/60.



 

Bill Anderson

Well-Known Member
#2
What camera are you using? Some cameras handle high ISO settings with less noise than others.

The graininess of high ISO settings can impart a certain dream-like or surreal quality to some photos, like the ones you have posted.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Pat

Photo Critiques Welcome
#4
What camera are you using? Some cameras handle high ISO settings with less noise than others.

The graininess of high ISO settings can impart a certain dream-like or surreal quality to some photos, like the ones you have posted.
These were with a D7000. My first digital was a D70. It's highest ISO was 1600 and it noised up faster.
 
#7
Loved the guy riding the hopper! Boy doesn't that bring back some memories. I once rode a back up move on a running reefer in weather like that for over a mile. I thought I was going to freeze to death.

I am not a fan of high ISO's at all. Even with my night shots I like to stay at 400. It's kinda of a pain and time consuming, but if you can get the longer shutter speed with the right amount of light you are better off. With moving objects though that can be very difficult. I think Nikon does a superior job with night photography. Canons are better with fast action even with low light. Sadly neither company does very well with photographing moving objects at night.
 

HDSDcouple

The Unwanted Line
#8
either way noise or less noise, they still are great pics. I don't about the rest you guys but I think we all judge our own photos to hard, pick them apart. I find most people i show pictures to could never tell the difference between those two photo's. I have purposely showed people a crappy photo and most still thing it is good because they only looking at the subject.

What noise reducing software are you using by the way Ron?
 

Bill Anderson

Well-Known Member
#9
What camera are you using? Some cameras handle high ISO settings with less noise than others.
My current photo arsenal includes Canon's 5D Mark III and 7D Mark II. The 5DIII handles ISO settings up to 25600 without much noise as long as I don't have to crop closely. I have been told this is partly due to its having a full frame sensor.

The 7DII, which has a crop-frame sensor, handles ISO settings up to 1600 without too much noise as long as I don't have to crop closely. Not as good as the 5DIII, but a great improvement over my 7D, which gets very noisy at ISO settings greater than 800.

While I regularly use both cameras for photographing birds and trains, which one I use at a particular time will depend on the circumstances. I will use the 5DIII and its higher ISO settings when shooting birds in deep shade under a tree canopy or in poor light such as an overcast Pacific North Wet day.
 





RailroadForums.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com

Top